Cryptography made simple / Nigel P. Smart

By: Smart, Nigel P. (Nigel Paul), 1967-Contributor(s): Ohio Library and Information NetworkMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Information security and cryptographyPublisher: Cham : Springer, [2015]Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319219363; 3319219367Subject(s): Data encryption (Computer science) | CryptographyGenre/Form: Electronic books. Additional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 005.8/2 LOC classification: QA76.9QA76.9.D35Online resources: Click here to access online | Click here to access online | SpringerLink Connect to resource (off-campus)
Contents:
Modular Arithmetic, Groups, Finite Fields and Probability -- Elliptic Curves -- Historical Ciphers -- The Enigma Machine -- Information Theoretic Security -- Historical Stream Ciphers -- Modern Stream Ciphers -- Block Ciphers -- Symmetric Key Distribution -- Hash Functions and Message Authentication Codes -- Basic Public Key Encryption Algorithms -- Primality Testing and Factoring -- Discrete Logarithms -- Key Exchange and Signature Schemes -- Implementation Issues -- Obtaining Authentic Public Keys -- Attacks on Public Key Schemes -- Definitions of Security -- Complexity Theoretic Approaches -- Provable Security: With Random Oracles -- Hybrid Encryption -- Provable Security: Without Random Oracles -- Secret Sharing Schemes -- Commitments and Oblivious Transfer -- Zero-Knowledge Proofs -- Secure Multiparty Computation
Summary: In this introductory textbook the author explains the key topics in cryptography. He takes a modern approach, where defining what is meant by "secure" is as important as creating something that achieves that goal, and security definitions are central to the discussion throughout. The chapters in Part 1 offer a brief introduction to the mathematical foundations: modular arithmetic, groups, finite fields, and probability; primality testing and factoring; discrete logarithms; elliptic curves; and lattices. Part 2 of the book shows how historical ciphers were broken, thus motivating the design of modern cryptosystems since the 1960s; this part also includes a chapter on information-theoretic security. Part 3 covers the core aspects of modern cryptography: the definition of security; modern stream ciphers; block ciphers and modes of operation; hash functions, message authentication codes, and key derivation functions; the "naive" RSA algorithm; public key encryption and signature algorithms; cryptography based on computational complexity; and certificates, key transport and key agreement. Finally, Part 4 addresses advanced prot ocols, where the parties may have different or even conflicting security goals: secret sharing schemes; commitments and oblivious transfer; zero-knowledge proofs; and secure multi-party computation. The author balances a largely non-rigorous style -- many proofs are sketched only -- with appropriate formality and depth. For example, he uses the terminology of groups and finite fields so that the reader can understand both the latest academic research and "real-world" documents such as application programming interface descriptions and cryptographic standards. The text employs colour to distinguish between public and private information, and all chapters include summaries and suggestions for further reading. This is a suitable textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, mathematics and engineering, and for self-study by professionals in information security. While the appendix summarizes most of the basic algebra and notation required, it is assumed that the reader has a basic knowledge of discrete mathematics, probability, and elementary calculus
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e-Books e-Books Main Library -University of Zimbabwe
Click on Online resources to access the e-Book QA76.9 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available

Includes bibliographical references and index

Modular Arithmetic, Groups, Finite Fields and Probability -- Elliptic Curves -- Historical Ciphers -- The Enigma Machine -- Information Theoretic Security -- Historical Stream Ciphers -- Modern Stream Ciphers -- Block Ciphers -- Symmetric Key Distribution -- Hash Functions and Message Authentication Codes -- Basic Public Key Encryption Algorithms -- Primality Testing and Factoring -- Discrete Logarithms -- Key Exchange and Signature Schemes -- Implementation Issues -- Obtaining Authentic Public Keys -- Attacks on Public Key Schemes -- Definitions of Security -- Complexity Theoretic Approaches -- Provable Security: With Random Oracles -- Hybrid Encryption -- Provable Security: Without Random Oracles -- Secret Sharing Schemes -- Commitments and Oblivious Transfer -- Zero-Knowledge Proofs -- Secure Multiparty Computation

Available to OhioLINK libraries

In this introductory textbook the author explains the key topics in cryptography. He takes a modern approach, where defining what is meant by "secure" is as important as creating something that achieves that goal, and security definitions are central to the discussion throughout. The chapters in Part 1 offer a brief introduction to the mathematical foundations: modular arithmetic, groups, finite fields, and probability; primality testing and factoring; discrete logarithms; elliptic curves; and lattices. Part 2 of the book shows how historical ciphers were broken, thus motivating the design of modern cryptosystems since the 1960s; this part also includes a chapter on information-theoretic security. Part 3 covers the core aspects of modern cryptography: the definition of security; modern stream ciphers; block ciphers and modes of operation; hash functions, message authentication codes, and key derivation functions; the "naive" RSA algorithm; public key encryption and signature algorithms; cryptography based on computational complexity; and certificates, key transport and key agreement. Finally, Part 4 addresses advanced prot ocols, where the parties may have different or even conflicting security goals: secret sharing schemes; commitments and oblivious transfer; zero-knowledge proofs; and secure multi-party computation. The author balances a largely non-rigorous style -- many proofs are sketched only -- with appropriate formality and depth. For example, he uses the terminology of groups and finite fields so that the reader can understand both the latest academic research and "real-world" documents such as application programming interface descriptions and cryptographic standards. The text employs colour to distinguish between public and private information, and all chapters include summaries and suggestions for further reading. This is a suitable textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, mathematics and engineering, and for self-study by professionals in information security. While the appendix summarizes most of the basic algebra and notation required, it is assumed that the reader has a basic knowledge of discrete mathematics, probability, and elementary calculus

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