The individual in the international legal system : continuity and change in international law / Kate Parlett

By: Parlett, KateMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge studies in international and comparative law (Cambridge, England : 1996) ; 75Copyright date: �2011Description: xlii, 413 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780521196666 (hardback); 0521196663 (hardback); 9781107610545 (paperback)Subject(s): Persons (International law) | Natural persons in public international lawOnline resources: Cover image
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Framework: 1. Structures of the international legal system; Part II. The Individual in International Law: 2. The individual and international claims; 3. The individual in international humanitarian law; 4. The individual in international criminal law; 5. The individual in international human rights law; Part III. Reassessing the Framework: 6. Reflections on the structures of the international legal system
Summary: "Kate Parlett's study of the individual in the international legal system examines the way in which individuals have come to have a certain status in international law, from the first treaties conferring rights and capacities on individuals through to the present day. The analysis cuts across fields including human rights law, international investment law, international claims processes, humanitarian law and international criminal law in order to draw conclusions about structural change in the international legal system. By engaging with much new literature on non-state actors in international law, she seeks to dispel myths about state-centrism and the direction in which the international legal system continues to evolve"-- Provided by publisherSummary: "In the relatively open and flexible international system of the 21st century, the formal status of entities may seem to have little significance. Whether an individual is a direct right-bearer or an indirect beneficiary of an inter-state obligation may seem to be a distinction without a difference for the operation of the primary rules of international law: either way, the individual benefits from some substantive right, held either directly or through its state of nationality. But when it comes to the operation of secondary rules, the distinction assumes practical significance"-- Provided by publisher
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Includes bibliographical references and index

Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Framework: 1. Structures of the international legal system; Part II. The Individual in International Law: 2. The individual and international claims; 3. The individual in international humanitarian law; 4. The individual in international criminal law; 5. The individual in international human rights law; Part III. Reassessing the Framework: 6. Reflections on the structures of the international legal system

"Kate Parlett's study of the individual in the international legal system examines the way in which individuals have come to have a certain status in international law, from the first treaties conferring rights and capacities on individuals through to the present day. The analysis cuts across fields including human rights law, international investment law, international claims processes, humanitarian law and international criminal law in order to draw conclusions about structural change in the international legal system. By engaging with much new literature on non-state actors in international law, she seeks to dispel myths about state-centrism and the direction in which the international legal system continues to evolve"-- Provided by publisher

"In the relatively open and flexible international system of the 21st century, the formal status of entities may seem to have little significance. Whether an individual is a direct right-bearer or an indirect beneficiary of an inter-state obligation may seem to be a distinction without a difference for the operation of the primary rules of international law: either way, the individual benefits from some substantive right, held either directly or through its state of nationality. But when it comes to the operation of secondary rules, the distinction assumes practical significance"-- Provided by publisher