Hume's 'A treatise of human nature' : an introduction / John P. Wright.

By: Wright, John PMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge introductions to key philosophical textsPublication details: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009Description: xx, 316 p. ; 23 cmISBN: 9780521833769 (hardback); 0521833760 (hardback); 9780521541589 (pbk.); 0521541581 (pbk.)Subject(s): Hume, David, 1711-1776. Treatise of human nature | Knowledge, Theory of | Emotions (Philosophy) | Ethics | Skepticism | Reason | Philosophical anthropologyOnline resources: Cover image Summary: "David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, as well as his arguments showing why we are nevertheless psychologically compelled to accept such beliefs. The book will be a valuable guide for those seeking to understand the nature of modern skepticism and its connection with the founding of the human sciences during the Enlightenment"--Provided by publisher.
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Open Shelf Books Open Shelf Books Main Library -University of Zimbabwe
Main Library Stack Room 4
mntk4 B1489 .W75 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) 1 Available 36003154715

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, as well as his arguments showing why we are nevertheless psychologically compelled to accept such beliefs. The book will be a valuable guide for those seeking to understand the nature of modern skepticism and its connection with the founding of the human sciences during the Enlightenment"--Provided by publisher.

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